03
Aug

New evidence arising from collaboration between NeuroDevNet’s cerebral palsy and autism researchers has uncovered surprisingly strong evidence for genetic causes for CP.

Stroke, oxygen deprivation and infections in newborns have long been considered causes of cerebral palsy, the most common cause of physical disability in children. CP is occurs in two out of every thousand births in Canada. “Clinically Relevant Copy Number Variants Detected in Cerebral Palsy,” published online today in Nature Communications has the potential to reboot understanding of the condition, as well as approaches to counseling, prevention and treatment of children with cerebral palsy.  

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20
Jul

NeuroDevNet researchers from the Network's neuroethics and neuroinformatics core groups have issued a collective call for improved consistency, depth and accessibility of governance and policies on data sharing in relation to vulnerable young populations.

In "Sharing with More Caring: Coordinating and Improving the Ethical Governance of Data and Biomaterials Obtained from Children," a research article published in July 2105 in PLOS One, Drs. Judy Illes, co-lead of NeuroDevNet's neuroethics group, and Elodie Portales Casamar, previous manager of NeuroDevNet's neuroformatics group, and collaborators Holly Longstaff and Vera Khramova, examined ethics and governance information on websites of databases involving neurodevelopmental disorders to determine the availability of information on key factors crucial for comprehension of, and trust and participation in increasingly common initiatives such as biorepositories.

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16
Jul

The Canadian Institutes for Health Research has announced the results of its highly competitive 2014 Foundation Grants competition. Amongst the 150 recipients are four NeuroDevNet investigators.

Drs. Lonnie Zwaigenbaum from the University of Alberta and Peter Szatmari, based at CAMH in Toronto, both received multi-million dollar grants focused on autism, and Dr. Adam Kirton from the University of Calgary received a similar amount to fund work in his perinatal stroke program. NeuroDevNet proudly acknowledges these accolades, and wishes to call special attention to grantee Dr. Jill Zwicker, a former Network Trainee, now on faculty as an assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy in the Faculty of Medicine at UBC, who received funding for her research focusing on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). DCD is a neurodisability that affects an estimated 400,000 Canadian children.

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